The Concept of responsible Advertising in Climate Change

THE WORLD IS HEATING UP AND NO ONE SEEMS TO BE TALKING ABOUT IT

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Advertising is beyond selling a product; it transcends connecting with the consumer; it is the ability to transform culture, effect a desired change, and compel people to take action. It is a no brainer to know that climate change is an important conversation in many parts of the world. The conversation, however, is seemingly silent in many parts of Africa, we be acting like it don’t concern us, truth is, as long as the continent remains afloat on the surface of the globe, it does. Otherwise, we all should build our own spaceship and move to Krypton, probably become Super Africans.

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This therefore makes it imperative for advertising agencies to champion the course by inducing and leading the conversation in Africa. Glaciers are melting, the earth crust is heating up, the ozone layer is depleting, and no one seems to be talking. I feel like even though we currently aren’t experiencing the harsh effects of climate change such as erratic thunder storms, heat waves, tsunamis and so on, Africa will still be dealt a huge a blow as we always get the worst end of the spoon.

Environmental economist Pavan Sukhdev in his book Corporation 2020 makes a compelling case for “responsible advertising”: a traffic-light system that highlights how long a product will last, where its materials come from and whether it can be recycled. Such an approach enables consumers to easily make purchasing decisions based on a brand’s ethical creds, meaning market forces would push advertisers into cleaning up their supply chains and operations. That would create much more impact than using marketing to merely start or support a debate - Bizcommunity.

Brace Yourself for the Future of Work

THE CHANGE IS HERE AND WE CAN NO LONGER IGNORE IT, THE FUTURE OF WORK SHOULD BE PREPARED FOR OTHERWISE, YOU’LL PHASE OUT VERY QUICKLY.

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In today’s world where digital has utterly disrupted the business landscape and hiring the right talents to help boost your company has increasingly become a challenge. If you and your organization aren’t agile enough to meet this trend head on it will certainly pose a problem to your venture.

As our obligation is here at TINK, we’ll bring you trends as they unfold so when they eventually hit you, you already heard it here first.

The future of work is a much talked about trend in the world over and Africa is no exception. The world is gearing towards

flexi-hours: having staff work favourable hours and not the daunting 9 to 5 we are all used to,

remote working: no matter where you are in the world you can work for whoever it is you may choose – this in my opinion is fantastic,

automated workforce: there has been so much talk about machines taking the jobs of humans – hate to be the bearer of bad news but that is not about to stop, in fact, it’s about to pick up pace. Many more people will yet lose their jobs to machines.

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Someone said the major driver of this change is time and I totally agree. With time comes change, which is why we use seasons to depict time in many cases. Well, for the purpose of this article, the time has ushered in a number of drivers that are championing this cause (Future of Work) and they are:

1. The growing population: In a little over the next ten years, the world's population will grow by another 1.15 billion people, reaching a total of 8.5 billion by 2030, with 97% from developing countries. Africa's population will double by 2050, while Europe's will shrink. Median ages will also diverge: Japan's median age will reach 53 by 2050, while Nigeria's will be 23. Africa's big challenge will be to create the right policy conditions to maximise returns from its younger population – PWC.

2. Urbanization: with an increased level of development in Africa and unrelenting traffic conditions it behoves businesses and the government to find other ways to help people do work and save time. It seriously doesn’t make any sense for one to sit in traffic 6 hours or more a day just to commute to and fro work.

3. Health and climate change concerns: the increased movement of the work population from one place to another is causing an increase in carbon (iv) oxide emitted from the combustion of car engines. This contributes to climate change concerns and also impacts negatively on one’s health.

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4. Tech and expertise: technology has recorded amazing successes in recent years that have helped to shorten the distance between teams and get real-time updates on tasks and projects. You can now have meetings and collaborate from any location around the world. Also, it may sometimes be difficult to get the right talent to fill a job role; technology helps you connect with that person seamlessly.

We are surely in for a great ride in the coming years and only businesses well suited for the change will win in the future of work.