Super Power or Survival Strategy

WHY DESIGNERS ARE BECOMING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Photography1.jpg

These days every African is seemingly unapologetically conscious of his or her resources especially finances and they guard it jealously. Which is why whenever they want to make a purchase, the commodity with more value for money wins the choice battle. As a result of this growing consciousness among individuals, there is, therefore, steep competition in virtually every facet of business. For the sake of this article, we will be looking into the creative industry and the new survival strategy among the ones they call “Creatives a.k.a Designers”.

Currently, the creative industry has seen more and more of its designers dabble with photography as they are compelled to go the extra mile to deliver more value on the job as such, they’ve taken on photography – talk about secret superpowers. Do you want to survive in this creative jungle? You need to bring something other than great knowledge of all the design suites, you need a great eye for colours and images, hence photography. The knowledge of light composition and style adds a different kind of spice to your work.

matthew-t-rader-1139072-unsplash.jpg

In terms of delivering value;

The gaping hole between designing and having the right images

Ever tried to search for African photos online? Daunting. I thought this was a joke as the internet is supposedly an archive of photos but try searching for photos of Africans doing something specific, you’ll almost not find. As more designers venture into photography with their knowledge of the specific needs of the creative industry, I am hopeful that soon we’ll close this gap.

Images are expensive

Trying to put together a photo session or even buy an image off of some stock site can be relatively expensive. In a view to deliver value and earn more, designers may take the pictures themselves and this way they’ll seamlessly get the right kind of image they desire.

The spicy ingredient

Designers with a relatively good knowledge of photography tend to put out better work as well as photographers with a relatively good knowledge of designing. The two go hand-in-hand (a couple).

Photography.jpg

The Richer The Messenger The Better The Experience

RICH COMMUNICATION SERVICES; A NEW INTRODUCTION TO MESSAGING THAT’LL CHANGE HOW WE CURRENTLY SEND MESSAGES

Source: Adweek

Source: Adweek

If you are familiar with business terms or consumer insight reports or you just use the internet from time to time, you may have come across the words “Customer Experience (CX)” at some point. Well, it is actually a big deal in the business landscape at the moment, as every business owner is working hard to ensure a consumer-centric standpoint in their organization. This is all in a view to enhance the customer experience. One thing to point out really is that CX is being powered largely by technology as newer techs are being introduced into the market to give consumers an experience of a lifetime.

Rich communications services also known as RCS is a technology that has been around for nearly 2 years; a great new introduction in mobile technology. If you don’t know what RCS is, it’s ok, most of the world is still catching on as many GSM and network service providers, especially in Africa, do not yet support the technology. The RCS technology basically helps you do everything your SMS, MMS, and third-party messaging apps like WhatsApp can do – talk about cannibalization. Guess the whole world, including the tech space, is some sort of jungle, everyone is constantly introducing some amazing innovation that tends to knock the other out of the market.

Who would benefit from this the most?

Even though end users are going to really enjoy this innovative solution, I think it is going to be the more beneficial to brands as it takes branding, customer experience, and data acquisition to a whole new level.

If you want to know more about this, watch the video below.

A Little Bit More

GOOGLE'S NEW ENCODER REDUCES THE SIZE OF JPEG'S WITHOUT REDUCING THE QUALITY

*Attempts to tag all personnel's in the marketing and communications industry* Brace yourself for the great news guys! Reducing the size of files (media and non-media) can be done without bothering about the quality of the image being tampered with as well; so feel free to own up to this mantra "a little bit more" when trying to attach a file and you have a specific dimension required, your quality is safe as before. Google has announced the arrival of a new open source encoder called Guetzli (cookie in Swiss German, not the one in empire  focus guys). The new algorithm will make it possible to reduce the size of JPEG images by about 35% without reducing the quality.

If you have never experienced this, let me paint a quick picture; I have legit spent a whole day trying to download a we-transfer file that needed to go up on the website by 10am; no it was not the network it was the fact that the images were large and were sent in bulk, did i get shouted at for being lackadaisical towards my job? Yes! Did my boss care about the fact that maybe if the photographer or media person involved had sent a smaller image folder things would have been done faster? No. This encoder has immediately solved two problems- Quick web navigation and ease of file transfers. 

In a press release , Google explained in detail how the encoder works. The non-technical explanation is that the algorithm "arranges" data that was previously disordered, making it easier to compress the file. The new means of compression produces a higher quality image than a typical JPEG. Google illustrates the difference below:

The original image is on the left. Guetzli (on the right) produces a less pixelated result than the standard JPEG (in the center) without the image size being larger. (Source: Google)

The original image is on the left. Guetzli (on the right) produces a less pixelated result than the standard JPEG (in the center) without the image size being larger. (Source: Google)

The downward side to it? The compression takes a long time, but it's worth it eventually, right? At least google thinks so and i second their thesis; furthermore  human raters, consistently preferred Guetzli images over traditional JPEGs; so media content transfer issue, solved!

New Media and The Future of Business in Africa

MEDIA MOGULS ARE EXPECTING A MASSIVE IMPROVEMENT IN THE MEDIA SECTOR THROUGH THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY. CHECK OUT NOTES FROM TOP MEDIA PERSONALITIES OBI ASIKA, MO' ABUDU AND BOLANLE AUSTEN-PETERS AT SOCIAL MEDIA WEEK LAGOS 2017

Immense progress have been made in technology in the past decade. Digital disruptions in Nigerian financial technology have caused varieties of channels of payments and transactions. Connecting this to the media, it has been found out that such progress has not be made in the Nigerian media stream. At the Social Media Week Lagos , 2017 Obi Asika, Bolanle Austen-Peters, Chika Nwobi, and Mo’ Abudu in a chat with media enthusiasts revealed how we can improve the Nigerian media sector like its the financial sector counterpart.

Here is an excerpt from the panel of discussion

MO ABUDU, CEO EBONY LIE TV AND PRODUCER, THE WEDDING PARTY

MO ABUDU, CEO EBONY LIE TV AND PRODUCER, THE WEDDING PARTY

Mo’ ABUDU

"Immensely!  The ‘Wedding party’ movie was successful because we drove the ads for the movie via social media and I must say that response was 10 times better than we did with the first movie we made.

We were able to interact with our online audience by creating content with scenes from the movie and made it relatable to them. We asked questions like how is your mother-in-law treating you? What is your favourite African dish? We also gave them the opportunity to meet and greet the stars at the Cinema which made them feel like a part of the community. We used each casts’ fan base

People want content that is relatable and that is why local content is winning. Your content can’t be too alien.

Should you have difficulty getting investors to carry the financial responsibility of you project, use collaboration which is key. Get friends with different needed skills and get them to collaborate to produce your content. This is important.

The one sentence I would advise content creators to always have at the back of their minds is to  CHANGE THE NARRATIVE

The future of media is that will see a lot more stories that will be churned out will have an African twist to it"

OBI ASIKA, MEDIA MOGUL AND CO-FOUNDER, SOCIAL MEDIA WEEK, LAGOS

OBI ASIKA, MEDIA MOGUL AND CO-FOUNDER, SOCIAL MEDIA WEEK, LAGOS

OBI ASIKA

"Technology indeed is changing the media landscape in Nigeria: The mobile phones gives the audience the democracy of access which is the simple most important thing.

The history and present day media put side by side, shows that back then on TV black content was rare. Now black content is dominating 30% of twitter space.

The future of media is mobile.

The most disruptive thing about the media today is that you see little people without pockets of money creating contents and are changing the face of entertainment and amassing tons of followers.

Social Media Platforms helping Media: These disruptions provides access. Here you can get thousands of people interested in what you do. This wasn’t the case about 20 years ago. Nigeria wants to talk. They want to connect.

To break through the media world you need to have a niche/focus. This is important. You also need to find a partner to collaborate with especially in financing.

Content creators in Nigeria should note that our biggest export is our culture. Not oil.

The one sentence I would encourage content creators to have in their consciousness is to grab opportunities. Embrace what makes you unique and use every opportunity to take that uniqueness global.

The future of media will be authenticity. Only those who have original and relatable content will go far."

BOLANLE AUSTEN-PETERS, FOUNDER TERRA KULTURE AND PRODUCER, SARO THE MUSICAL

BOLANLE AUSTEN-PETERS, FOUNDER TERRA KULTURE AND PRODUCER, SARO THE MUSICAL

BOLANLE AUSTEEN-PETERS

"Mobile phones have changed the media world. Through the phone, we can do marketing easily and attract large audience base.

The most important thing content creators should note is that In Nigeria, local content is critical.

Fashion, food, literature, television, movie are the sectors of entertainment to watch out for in the next few years to make massive profits from.

The one word I would always say to content creators is QUALITY. Always make sure your work can stand the international market

Here’s the future of Media- Africans will begin to tell African stories. Take a look at Beyonce’s recent works with lemonade and the Grammy award performance. She sold the African culture to the world."

Meet 18 Nigerians working with Mark Zuckrberg

A QUICK REMINDER THAT NIGERIANS IN DIASPORA ARE ACTIVELY HELPING TO FLY THE FLAG HIGH

NB: Feature stories like this are written to remind us that in the very words of Lupita Nyong'o 

No matter where you are from, your dreams are valid.

The very society we live in is such that, we are made to believe that by just being born black, you are "wrong" and so little to no expectations are attached to the black man with laws and actions to restrict our successes as much as possible. But it is rather amazing and more inspiring when Nigerians both home and abroad have put aside strong barriers placed, gone and fought and raised the bar high for the young, hustling and hopeful Nigerian. 

EBELE OKOBI

Ebele Okobi who played a key role in Mark's visit to Nigeria; has headed Public Policy for Facebook in Africa for the past 2 years. She was the former Global Head & Senior Legal Director, Human Rights for Yahoo!

CHUKWUEMEKA AFIGBO

Chukwuemeka Afigbo joined Facebook from Google, where he served until 2015 before being replaced by Aniedi Udo-Obong. He currently manages Strategic Product Partnerships for Facebook in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Ime Archibong

Ime Archibong is the Director, Strategic Partnerships at Facebook, where he leads a team working to connect Facebook’s products and strategies with various business partners.Archibong and his team have worked on everything related to Facebook including the Messenger app. Prior to joining Facebook, Archibong was an Advanced Technology Business Development Professional at IBM.

Nmachi Jidenma

FB 4.jpg

Nmachi Jidenma manages Payments and Commerce Partnerships for Facebook Global, right from the heart of San Francisco Bay Area.

With previous experiences working at PayPal, Google and JP Morgan, she also happens to be the founder of CPAfrica.

Laurence Adeyemi

Laurence Aderemi built Moni, a person-to-person money transfer app, which won the 2013 edition of Start with e-novation.

Apparently, his competence got the attention of Mark Zuckerberg, who hired him to head Payments and Commerce Partnerships for Facebook Global.

Morin Oluwole

Having been raised in Nigeria but lived in 3 different continents, Morin Oluwole is a polyglot — she speaks about 5 languages. This is probably why she sealed a role as the Chief of Staff, VP Global Marketing Solutions at Facebook. She has since taken up a new position as the Luxury Vertical Lead for Facebook/Instagram.

Lauryn Hale Ogebchie

LAURYN ON THE LEFT

LAURYN ON THE LEFT

Lauryn Ogbechie leads a Strategic Partnership team within Facebook’s Global Platform Partnerships organisation in Menlo Park, CA. In this role she partners with mobile developers to help them build, grow and monetise their apps through the integration of Facebook platform products.

Prior to Facebook, Ogbechie worked as a digital organiser for President Obama’s re-election campaign.

Francis Ebong

Francis Ebong joined Facebook in November 2015 where he has since acted in the capacity of Director, Online Operations. Francis is a graduate of The George Washington University.

Teniola Adedipe

TENIOLA ON THE LEFT

TENIOLA ON THE LEFT

Prior to joining Facebook, Teniola Adedipe served in two capacities within Konga (Nigerian eCommerce giant), in the space of 14 months. She started out as the Head, Merchandise Planning in January 2014, she then went on to become Associate Director, Retail Operations.

Teniola Adedipe is now the Program Manager, Deal Desk & Global Agency at Facebook, New York City area. 

Monica Ugwi

Still relatively new at the company, Monica Ugwi works with the Product Operations division of Facebook. Prior to that, she was an Engagement Manager for McKinsey & Company and an Analyst at Goldman Sachs.

A graduate of Computer Science, Ugwi also holds a Masters in Business Administration from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business.

Ibrahim Shekoni

FB 11.jpeg

Ibrahim Sekoni is Facebook’s Product Specialist at San Francisco Bay Area. His previous experience no doubt played a huge role in blending him into Facebook.

Prior to joining Facebook, he was the Mobile Product Manager at optionXpress where he managed the top-rated mobile trading App across multiple Mobile platforms. He also worked as a Business Analyst at Phoenix bits LTD overseeing various operations. He joined Facebook in April 2015.

Olaoluwa Okelola

Olaoluwa Okelola is one of the few Nigerian-born software engineers at Facebook and has been with them since 2007.

Having completed his secondary education at the International School Ibadan, Okelola proceeded to Avi-Cenna International School and Howard University, Washington DC, to complete his secondary and university education respectively. He then joined Microsoft as Explorer Intern in January 2005 and left in August the same year for Google where he worked as an Engineering intern from May 2006 until August 2006.

Barbara Mbanefo

Barbara Mbanefo is another Nigerian-born software Engineer at Facebook, where she develops iOS applications that help businesses connect with their customers.

Mbanefo completed her primary and secondary education in Nigeria before proceeding to France to obtain her Masters degree in Software Engineering. She speaks French fluently. Prior to joining Facebook in May 2016, Mbanefo worked as a Software Engineer and a Mobile App User Experience Designer in France, Canada and Hollywood, California

Kunbi Adeyemo

Kunbi Adeyemo has served in two capacities at Facebook. Between 2013 and 2014, she was on the Facebook North America Small and Medium Business Team as a Customer Insights Analyst.

In December 2014, Adeyemo moved up to the San Francisco Bay Area, where she has since served as Facebook’s Diversity Programs Manager – Women in Computer Science.

Isaac Nwokocha

After obtaining a First Class degree in Mechanical Engineering degree from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka in 2010, Isaac Nwokocha tried his hands out on entrepreneurship; he co-founded two startups, including real-time road traffic web app, TrafficDey.

Probably deciding he had had enough of entrepreneurship, Nwokocha proceeded to Stanford for a Master’s Degree in Management Science and Engineering. No sooner had he completed his Masters Degree than he secured a role as a Product Data Integrity, Community Operations/Project Manager at Facebook.

Michael Awotedu

With an MBA in Finance (summa cum laude) from the University of Tampa John H. Sykes College of Business, Michael Awotedu works in Risk Program Management at Facebook where he helps to facilitate strategy, and execution for Risk Management on products like FB games, Oculus VR and Ads.

Prior to Facebook, Awotedu oversaw Risk Management for Walmart’s $30 billion check cashing portfolio.

Jane Okpala

With almost 10 years of strategic, analytical, negotiating, presentation, and management expertise, Jane Okpala is the Product Specialist (Social Good and Goodwill), Community Operations, at Facebook.

A polyglot in her own right — she speaks at least 4 languages — Okpala worked previously as an Associate at McKinsey & Company where she served mainly technology and financial institution clients on a wide variety of analytical and strategic engagements

Dayo Olapade

Dayo Olopade started her career as a journalist in Washington, covering the 2008 campaign and the Obama era for publications including The Atlantic, The Guardian and The Washington Post.

Nowadays, Olopade applies her wealth of journalistic experience on the Facebook Media Partnerships Team, where she helps publishers take advantage of Facebook, from a business and product perspective. She maintains a painstakingly detailed personal website.

What we need you to do? First rid yourself of any unconscious or conscious societal barrier, Secondly take a book and vividly write down your goals with time frame if you like then go out and get them actualized.