The non-alcoholic alcohol

SAVANNA LAUNCHES THE FIRST NON-ALCOHOLIC CIDER IN SOUTH AFRICA IN A VIEW TO ANSWER THE QUESTIONS OF INCREASING CONSCIOUS CONSUMPTION

Talk about breaking rules, changing status quo, and altering norms. Savanna cider is blazing a new trail in the food and drinks department with this “alcohol-less alcohol” innovation, The Savanna Lemon – really, ever heard of a non-alcoholic cider? If you are still in doubt, kindly look up the meaning of cider in your dictionary. So whether you agree or query the innovation as not being a cider, that’s still up for debate, however Savanna is using the innovation to satisfy the taste buds of the more conscious consumer – the growing health conscious African consumer. This takes away the anxiety and paranoia that comes from looking for that drink that best fits your dietary plans yet leaves with that cider taste without alcohol.

We have seen more and more people take to fitfam, organic food consumption, and restrain themselves from consuming little or too much alcohol all in a view to stay healthy and lead a long and vibrant life. All this is good but Savanna is TINKing, that there are too many things in Africa to be worried about and what you drink shouldn’t be one of them.

Source: Bizcommunity

Source: Bizcommunity

To bring this innovation to life, Savanna launched Savanna Lemon with an integrated marketing campaign where it challenges consumers to break the rules. Because when you drink alcohol, you’re confined by rules – social rules, law-enforced rules, even rules that you give yourself. And let’s face it: rules are no fun. This campaign is brought to life in the new Savanna Non-Alcoholic Lemon advert, which showcases the most unlikely characters challenging the norms of where a non-alcoholic cider should be consumed – The Bizcommunity.

“We’re constantly looking for innovative ways to corrupt the apple and bring to life products and ideas consumers will love,” says Annette Grootboom, Global Brand Development Manager for Savanna, “The great thing about Savanna Non-Alcoholic Lemon is that it tastes like cider, which allows people to make a lot more choices – and break a lot more rules.”

So if you plan to have a good time and don’t want to feel those headaches that come from a hangover best grab a bottle of Savanna Lemon.

The Future of Food

A HARD LOOK INTO THE STATE OF FOOD, CURRENT CONSUMPTION PATTERNS, AND WHERE FOOD IS HEADED IN THE NEAREST FUTURE.

Source: Diaspora Kitchen

Source: Diaspora Kitchen

Did you know, today, worldwide, for every malnourished person, there are two people who are obese or overweight? 868 million undernourished people and 1.5 billion obese or overweight people globally – according to Eating in 2030: trends and perspectives 2018 report. Guess where the highest concentration of malnourished people reside, yes your guess is obviously as good as mine. Africa remains the continent with the highest prevalence of undernourished people in the world. Affecting almost 21% of the population (more than 256 million people), South America follows immediately after with 5% in 2017, and fewer in Northern America and Europe with 2.5%, according to the state of food security and nutrition in the world 2018 report.

Did you know 36 million people die every year from lack of food and 29 million people from too much food globally? This is a perfect case of choosing your demon, would you rather die from the lack of or too much food? My answer is neither.

And did you know one-third of all food produced worldwide is made for feeding livestock? In addition, a growing share of agricultural land is used for the production of biofuel. This means we are choosing to feed both animals and automobiles instead of people (Eating in 2030: trends and perspectives 2018 report).

Also, did you know every year 1.3 billion tons of perfectly edible food is wasted, while 868 million people suffer from hunger globally? This is the state of food in the world at the moment, we are likely headed for hunger, aren’t we?

Source: Video Blocks

Source: Video Blocks

Right now there’s so much conversation about the importance of food, which is why we see an increasing number of Africans adopting health consciousness and consuming more organic food as opposed to the synthesized meals. However, following the obvious trend of emotional eating the conversation would soon shift from the importance of food to the importance of healthy eating. People are anxious with weight loss and as such take up unhealthy dietary plans that do more harm than good. The growing scale of depression and emotional ill health in Africa is causing people to find solace in food without much care of the composition of what they put in their mouths.

The future of food is seemingly bleak but the great part is, it can be salvaged. We do not have to adopt the knee jerk approach where we have to wait for the future to come before we implement measures to deal with it.

dragne-marius-117368-unsplash.jpg

What can we do?

  • Use the high interconnectedness that currently exists among people to disseminate information around the importance of healthy eating.

  • Institutions should promote the adoption of lifestyles and eating habits that favor the consumption of foods that contribute to a healthy diet and have less impact on the eco-system of the planet

  • The industry should focus more on promoting the purchase of healthy foods and use balanced price leverage to discourage the use of junk food

  • Strategies should be deployed to encourage people to find the space and time to devote to meals in the company of other people. This way they are motivated to eat healthier meals.

  • More so, the food industry must continue to develop new forms of convenience foods that have a high level of nutrition

Who’s Hungry?

BEFORE NOW, THERE SEEMINGLY USED TO BE FOOD IN EVERY STREET CORNER, NOW THERE’S A FOOD AD EVERY TIME YOU TURN ON YOUR PHONE – TALK ABOUT INSTA-FOOD

Source:  freakingnews.com

Source: freakingnews.com

Can you feel it? No actually, can you taste it?

Someone once said that the businesses that will rule tomorrow have yet to be created. This I find to be very true as the world’s greatest businesses today didn’t exist 10 years ago. 90% of them ride on the back of technology, in fact most of them are tech firms. In the same vein, the businesses that will rule the economic landscape in the next ten years have yet to be birthed.

However, this article isn’t about some futuristic business, it’s about a certain type of business that has grown astronomically in Africa, particularly Nigeria – Online Kitchen.

Source: Unsplash

Source: Unsplash

Tell me, when was the last time you turned on social media and you didn’t see a food ad or something? The plethora of online food vendors these days is alarming but welcomed at the same time. These online vendors are meeting a very important need as a large number of the urban population are relatively busy and may not have the time to prepare delicious and healthy meals and as such these vendors offer delivery services – they will bring the meal to you – awesome isn’t it?

Well, this narrative isn’t about to change anytime soon, consumers will only get busier and the most innovative online vendor will win.

Africans with the Floss

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE AFRICAN TWIG? PEOPLE NO LONGER FIND IT FANCY OR WHAT?

Source: Chicagokidsdds.com

Source: Chicagokidsdds.com

Back in the day I always heard older ones say how that the African twig is more natural, healthy, and yes of course, cheaper – some even say that it is medicinal and cures certain ailments unlike the “modern day” means of keeping great oral hygiene. Fast forward to a couple years later, no one seems to be spotted using the African twig, called chewing stick in Nigeria, Sothiou in Senegal, Mswaki in Swahili speaking African speaking nations.

However, this trend isn’t about the extinction of the African twig (still in use in many rural places in Africa), or the use of a toothbrush (whether manual or electric), but it is about the fact that Africans have begun to floss.

It is true that Africans have increasingly become health conscious and oral hygiene is gradually becoming an important topic for discuss. Although we are still trying to get a hang of flossing but it is likely to become an important part of culture.

Source: Unsplash

Source: Unsplash

No one likes a bad breath, plaque, or discoloration of the teeth. Millenials and generation Z communities want to look presentable when they step out and also exude utmost confidence. As a result seeing the dentist, brushing the teeth twice a day, and flossing is becoming the way to go for oral hygiene.

Bye bye to the twig.

Will Fizzy Drinks Ever Die?

AFRICANS ARE BEGINNING TO PUSH BACK OF THE CONSUMPTION OF FIZZY DRINKS; IS THIS THE END OR IS THERE NEED FOR SOMETHING FRESH?

Source: Unsplash

Source: Unsplash

I am an advocate for innovation, anything that’s done the same way for a period of time becomes boring and redundant in any part of the continent you are reading this article from. Just so you know, I am leaving the question stated in the caption open for you to answer and hopefully, the words you read from here on in will guide your argument.

Will fizzy drinks ever die, especially in Africa?

We are aware, the average African consumer is adopting a healthy lifestyle and is increasingly conscious about his/her well-being especially in terms of products that go in to the body. One content that’s present in many food and drink products these days is sugar – apparently, Africans are sweet like that, however we are being encouraged to cut down on its intake in order to lead a long and healthy life. As a result, fizzy drinks have come under fire.

Source: Unsplash

Source: Unsplash

South Africa currently has imposed a sugar tax upon manufacturers who produce contents with sugar in a view to discourage the industry. Rest assured that fizzy drinks companies are getting the long end of the cane.

The carbonated soft drinks industry has continued to remain optimistic despite a seemingly ailing future as they have launched campaigns that have spiked the growth of the industry in recent years. For example Coca-cola launched an award winning campaign “Share a coke”, In South Africa, Twizza partnered with Primedia Outdoor to launch its "Summer Fo Sho" competition.

Following this trend, the rise of low-calorie alternatives for fizzy drinks have begun to flood the market and Africans are embracing the innovation.

So I ask you one more time, will fizzy drinks ever die?

Kindly let us know what you TINK in the comment section below.