What’s Next With Dance?

HUMAN BEINGS ARE VERY CREATIVE; CONSTANTLY INVENTING NEW DANCE MOVES -IT CAN SOMETIMES BE OVERWHELMING.

Source: EneNaija

Source: EneNaija

Is it that someone sits somewhere and brainstorms on a new dance move or while enjoying good music a dance move pops into the mind? because it is just amazing the kind of moves that have hit the dance floors and we just want to know, what's coming next? 

When you think you’ve seen it all, something new will hit you like an ocean tide slapping itself against the shore. Surely, we thought there couldn’t be anything else after yahoozee but no, many more have rocked the dance floor. If you don't know some moves mentioned here, its ok, you will be fine, some of us are already old.

I remember when I was yet to perfect my Crip walk; after giving up on learning Galala, Swoor came along, and then azonto; West Africa surely did fall in love with azonto as it was showcased in practically every single music video.

Soon after, Nigerian artists brought Skelewu, Sekem, etighi, alkayida, and Shakiti bobo to the spotlight; shutting down events and parties while bursting out these moves. 
 

Then after came another dance move, shoki. If you didn’t know this move then you didn’t know anything about dance. Ladies always wanted to be around the best dancers but I couldn’t be bothered.

At the moment the shaku shaku and gwara gwara crase is seemingly unmatched by any other dance move that we've seen in the past or any other that currently lives along side them. And so we ask the question again, what’s next with dance?
I for one can’t wait to see what the next move will likely be, and as a result, I have started taking flexibility classes to unlock these stiff bones. I have to be ready to steal the show, oppress the boys and impress the girls.

So, other than giving you an interesting read and taking you on a jolly ride through time, this article is also designed to make you google every dance move mentioned and learn them.

Dance X History

USING BODY LANGUAGE AS AN ART TO CONNECT WITH OUR HISTORY

Amazing how a group of young African (Afro-Mexican)  women living in Oaxaca came up with an initiative to preserve our rich and diverse culture through song and dance ( which is known to be a universal symbol of unity; in that whether or not you understand the lyrics or origin of a song, half the time you still sing along, right?

Afro-Mexicans are Mexicans who have a heritage from Sub-Saharan Africa. They are an ethnic group made up of recent immigrants of African descent to Mexico and the descendants of slaves, such as in the communities of the Costa Chica of Oaxaca and GuerreroVeracruz and in some cities in northern Mexico. The history of blacks in Mexico has been lesser known for a number of reasons: their relatively small numbers, regular intermarriage with other ethnic groups, and Mexico’s tradition of defining itself as a “mestizaje” or mixing culture.

GROUP MEMBER, GETTING READY FOR A PERFORMANCE

GROUP MEMBER, GETTING READY FOR A PERFORMANCE

“Dance really lives in our bodies and the thing that I’ve come to learn, embrace and lift up is that we have history in our bodies that’s living and breathing,” Brown (choreographer & dancer shared. “We have our own individual history but we also have our heritage. Each one of us has our movement language and it’s about tapping into that and pulling that out.”

DANCE GROUP DURING A PERFORMANCE

DANCE GROUP DURING A PERFORMANCE

For many years in Mexico, until 2015, Blacks lived in Mexico for centuries without recognition until 2015, which saw a shift. For the first time in Mexico’s history, its census bureau recognized the country’s Black population in a national survey that put the number of afro Mexicans at approximately, 1.4 million citizens (1.2% of the population) who self-identify as “Afro-Mexican” or “Afro-descendant.”

LEADER OF THE DANCE GROUP, ANAI HERRERA

LEADER OF THE DANCE GROUP, ANAI HERRERA

“All the dances are from Africa’s northeastern region, we chose this area because after researching on the internet, we realized that that’s where the slaves that came from our town came from. Our dance troupe did the research and we learned those dances,” Anai Herrera, one of the lead dancers, said.

STATUE OF OBATALA

STATUE OF OBATALA

“In school, they teach our children about Europeans and indigenous natives, but the history books practically don’t recognize our history.”

What the Obatala dancers have done is to simply raise awareness about the knowledge of afro-Mexicans, and for they in themselves to be a part of the African culture and take deep pride in it; because to be an integral part of something and still not be recognized or talked about is disheartening to say the least, it is subtly saying you don’t exist; imagine being a member of your family but still have to spend years proving and raising awareness of your rights to the family name and other privileged benefits just because your siblings feel you aren’t good enough or sideline you because of hidden leadership and revered skills.