Stream The Nigerian Way

UPCOMING NIGERIAN MUSICIANS HAVE AN INDIGENOUS MUSIC CLOUD OVER SOUND CLOUD TO PUSH OUT THEIR ART

Prior to this article, we talked about how streaming was undoubtedly the future of the music industry and the panacea for artists unfair treatment. There is no such thing as "too many songs" no room for arguments. MusicCloud has launched in Nigeria to allow users discover, stream, download and share music from upcoming indigenous artistes.

Launched 3 months ago, the platform was created for artistes to showcase their work and offer a whole world to music addicts. It allows artistes to sign up, create a profile and upload their music. A fun user experience is ensured with access to works from Nigerian DJ's and artists by using the site's "Discover" function and rather than come up to the platform whenever you want new music in your playlist, you get notified via sms about new content, great right?  

With strong competition as soundcloud, and the fact that it basically offers the same purpose which is mainly streaming; why the advent in the first place and why should we make the switch despite the locality of the platform?

“There are music services available which cater to Western regional markets, however, there is a gap in the market for a streamlined, easy-to-use service dedicated to emerging and alternative local Nigerian music. We face competition from the likes of SoundCloud and ReverbNation, whose platforms are built with Western folk in mind. But MusicCloud is built for Nigerians and Africans, and we aim to continuously study the market, as well as keeping everything simple on the platform – from surfing around to streaming and downloading; simple.

With their just 3-month-old platform and over 2000 registered users, plans are already in motion to take the platform first across Africa and then globally with increased user base, artists portfolio, and employing consumer insight to constantly ensure excellent user experience through one of such ways as offering subscriptions that tally with content provided. 

Memes make the World go round

FOR THE INTERNET SAVVY PERSON, THERE ARE NOW FINE ART VERSIONS OF THE MOST POPULAR MEMES ON SOCIAL MEDIA.

If I was to make an achievement list of all the things birthed by social media, as much I want to sound serious, networking would not be at the top of my list but memes would be. You can imagine my joy when I found out that a Delware-born visual artist, Alim Smith, turned some of internet's most popular memes into actual pieces of art. 

With an average aggregate likes of over 20,000 retweets, the buzz from his arts are still on the uprise and it is only right to make you fall in love with his art and memes even more. We have some of the works on twitter @yesterdaynite and website here

Write Your Way to the ATM

MEET THE NIGERIANS, KELECHI UDOAGWU AND TOLU AGUNBIADE, WHO HAVE CREATED AN APPLICATION THAT HELPS FREELANCE WRITERS GET PAID.

KELECHI UDOAGWU AND TOLU AGUNBIADE, FOUNDERS OF  SKRIFE

KELECHI UDOAGWU AND TOLU AGUNBIADE, FOUNDERS OF SKRIFE

If you are creative in Africa, you know how hard it is to make decent money off your craft.

Person: So what do you do?

Me: I'm a content Strategist

Person: Lol, so you just like write all the time?

Me: Yeah, it's not as easy as you think.

Person: *rolls eyes* It can't be that hard, how do you even make money from that?

What the Skrife application does, is simply establish a network between writers and companies in need of them. It offers entrepreneurs, start-ups and brands an access to a pool of freelancers and even editors. Initially developed in 2016, the app was in a test-run phase, in which it attended to over 150 requests received from about 20 clients, and has now finally been made public. So finally writers have another means of making extra income. *laughs in writers powers*

THE PROCESS AT   SKRIFE

THE PROCESS AT SKRIFE

It is not hard to be a business owner these days, but what it takes for your business to be valid is spotting problems in your immediate society and coming up with viable solutions to tackle it. At the beginning of their start-up, they got an equity-free funding of N6,900,000.00 (US$15,000.00) from S Factory, a spin-off from the start-up chile program. Holding currently under its umbrella of clients are African Leadership University, Paystack, Ingressive, Tress and Start Smart. 

From personal experience and from other founders around us, we noticed that most startups always hope to use content marketing, but don’t have the skills to write good content.

“Writing is a chore for most people but not us, so we decided to create something that solves this problem for them and leverages our skills.
— Disrupt Africa
BENEFICIARIES OF THE APPLICATION

BENEFICIARIES OF THE APPLICATION

If you are writer and you're not up for a 9-5 job, I can feel your pizzazz from way over, sign up here and do what you love and take that funky walk to the ATM.

Art X History

RELIVING HISTORY WITH ARTISTIC EXPRESSION

FRED MARTINS

FRED MARTINS

Have you met Fred Martins? He is the Nigerian artist who uses afro comb to illustrate portraits of African Activists, born in Aggah-Egbema and lived in Omoku both in Rivers State, Nigeria. “I started as a graphic designer in 2004 and later grew into visual art, conceptualizing and directing surreal photography and short art videos aside making digital arts”; currently in Lviv, Ukraine, he turns to the iconic afro comb to illustrate portraits of African activists such as Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, Patrice Lumumba and Fela Kuti, all who were discredited for advocating for freedom and fairness for Africans. 

Want to connect with him further? visit his website here

 

His latest project

The Afro comb dates back to pre-dynastic Egypt, though it became a provocative symbol in the 1970s when its iconography evolved into a black fist, referencing the spirit of the Civil Rights and Black Panther movements, becoming synonymous with black pride and identity. And according to History Workshop, the Afro comb of this era was originally patented by two black Americans, Samuel H. Bundles Jr., and Henry M. Childrey. 

However, many manifestations emerged during that period, including a folding comb. Some viewed the hair accessory as an inflammatory symbol, which contributed to police stopping and frisking Afro comb-wearers. It also came to represent cross-cultural exchange among people from the African diaspora as color variations were manufactured in Nigeria in the early 1980s.

 

His newest project tagged “Orange, Black and Freedom.” has received worldwide acclaim; "I chose orange because it's associated with prison", he told CNN; using jail mug shots to capture a side view of the activists' faces, Fred hopes for  young Africans to know more about our history and guide it through time, and for African leaders to champion good leadership. As for the comb, he says "Worn in the 1970s by fluffy afro-ed youths in America as a protest against repression, it's a symbol that goes beyond style and adornment."

As for the comb, he says "Worn in the 1970s by fluffy afro-ed youths in America as a protest against repression, it's a symbol that goes beyond style and adornment."

What interests us about Fred is that even in this technology age where efforts are rather made to erase and tarnish african history, is a new generation man rather than go neck deep in to social media utilization would rather focus his art on cultural preservation and story telling.