Ghana Earns Bragging Rights

MEET THE GHANAIAN NEUROSURGEON RESIDENT WHO HAS MADE HISTORY AT JOHN HOPKINS HOSPITAL.

#BlackGirlMagic; Ghanaian medical student, Nancy Abu-Bonsrah who relocated to the US 111 years ago at the age of 15 with her parents, just became the first black female in over 124-years to be a neurosurgical resident at Johns Hopkins’ Hospital. 

NANCY ABU-BONSRAH

NANCY ABU-BONSRAH

I am very much interested in providing medical care in undeserved settings, specifically surgical care, I hope to be able to go back to Ghana over the course of my career to help in building sustainable surgical infrastructure,” said Abu-Bonsrah in a statement. “I will be matching into neurosurgery, a field that I am greatly enamored with, and hope to utilize those skills in advancing global surgical care.
I want to be remembered for serving my community, whether it is through providing quality surgical care or helping mentor the next generation of surgeons,

On Friday, March 17, 2017, during a medical rite in the U.S known as "Match Day", Ms. Nancy Abu-Bonsrah opened her envelope, which matched with the Johns Hopkins University to specialise in neurological surgery. This automatically made her the first black female neurosurgeon at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, after which she will begin a three to seven year residency program.

Amidst the viral mentions, posts and comments she has been getting on all social media platforms, in a Facebook post, Abu-Bonsrah said, "What a way to begin the Sabbath! I still haven’t processed it yet but this is such an honor and a privilege to join the department at Hopkins to begin this next phase of my career. I’m so fortunate to have the continued support of my husband, family, friends and mentors.  Kwabena and I are excited for what’s ahead! #match2017 #glorytoGod #wemadeit #sevenmoreyears #Neurosurgery #firstfemaleAAatHopkins."

Congratulations Nancy! Fear not Ghanaians. Nancy plans to return to the country over the course of the years to built sustainable health infrastructural facilities.