Email To Your Boss

TIPS ON HOW TO SEND A PROPER MAIL TO YOUR BOSS, IF YOU JUST GOT YOUR FIRST JOB

When I got my first job, asides the pizzazz that it came with and new wave of responsibility I knew little to nothing about work fundamentals. I had expected that I would go through a training or internship like you see in the movies but nope! I was already running full staff responsibilities on the first day. Not only did this keep me at bay, I was constantly scared of my next steps, constantly thinking of my mistakes than actually getting work done, and it only got worse when I sent my first email to my boss. 

In a bid to quickly send an email to my boss as directed by my departmental head, the due greetings were omitted, i not only did not hear the last of it i knew I was wrong and I felt bad for a really long time. Was she mad at me because she hated me? No, it is just due protocol, and it will surprise you that we were pretty close, so at work all that should go in the box. 

So straight to my tips; before I go ahead and list them all out, do not send an email if you know it is unnecessary or if it is something that you can easily say to your boss and or that needs immediate attention, depending on the proximity, calls are usually better especially in the situation where she has a visitor, a mail in this case will do no good. 

// Ensure it is your official email address; except you have not yet been offered one (in which case you should push for it) and this is especially something to note if you would be sending from your phone and both mails are responsive on your device.

// Use a Proper and Concise Header: for example, UPDATES FROM TEAM MEETING and not THESE ARE THE PROCEEDS FROM THE MEETING HELD BEFORE YOU RESUMED WORK

// Salutation: Even if your boss happens to be your in-law or brother, a proper salutation is important as it helps you put your head into work and not feel at home or lackadaisical. So Good Day Sir/Ma would work; and you can't put your bosses name in here, like, Good morning Sarah again this depends on proximity). You also do not want to miss out any extra titles they have earned like "Dr.  

// Aim: You know how we were thought to write letters back in primary school; "my main aim of writing this letter is to..."; keep the letter short and stick to your aim related to your title. He or she is your boss, chances are they would be busy, so you want to pass your message across as quickly as possible.

// Proofread: The last thing you want to do is let your boss correct the email in her head as she reads, so check for spelling errors and punctuation marks, no it is not being extra.

However my guidelines listed above, every office as it is different, has its own rules, so find out from an old colleague and get acquainted with how things work there, okay?