Dolls Deserve Wheelchairs Too.

CREATOR OF LAMILLY DOLLS, NICKOLAY LAMM, THINKS DOLLS SHOULD BE REALISTIC

This video was filmed at St. Edmund's Academy, an independent, preschool - 8th grade day school in Pittsburgh, PA. It shows the reaction of 2nd graders comparing a typical fashion doll with the Lammily doll. The Lammily doll was designed with realistic human proportions using the average measurements of a typical 19 year old woman.

Nickolay Lamm is the creator of Lammily, the ‘normal Barbie’ that comes complete with acne, stretchmark’s, and realistic proportions.

After the advent of Lammily, Nickolay was praised for finally creating a doll children could relate to. One that represented them, rather than giving young girls damaging, unrealistic expectations about their bodies. Like that alone was not enough ground breaking innovation; He recently launched a Kickstarter in the hopes of raising $27,500 (£21,800) to make wheelchairs for dolls.

PHOTO BY LAMMILY

PHOTO BY LAMMILY

Kickstarter helps artists, musicians, filmmakers, designers, and other creators find the resources and support they need to make their ideas a reality. It is an enormous global community built around creativity and creative projects. Our mission is to help bring creative projects to life.

You can Nickolay to make his doll wheelchairs a reality, you can donate to his Kickstarter. If you donate $18 (£15) or more, you’ll get an early edition doll wheelchair of your own.

On the Kickstarter page Nickolay explains that while dolls have actually been sold with wheelchairs before, the last wheelchair sold for a major brand’s doll was discontinued in 1997 for unstated reasons; and so he wants to bring wheelchairs for dolls back.

PROTOTYPE OF THE WHEELCHAIRS

PROTOTYPE OF THE WHEELCHAIRS

"It didn’t make sense to me that fashion dolls can have chairs, tables, cars, mansions – pretty much any accessory you can think of, but not a wheelchair" Nickolay told metro.co.uk.

Nickolay has set out on designing a prototype wheelchair with the capacity to fit most fashion dolls currently being sold, including Barbie, Disney Princess dolls, and even his own Lammily dolls.

 ‘To me, toys are like a diorama of life. If kids can see diversity in their toys I feel they can see diversity in others, and accept and love them for who they are.’

PHOTO BY LAMMILY

PHOTO BY LAMMILY

If the Kickstarter is successfully funded, Nickolay will be able to mass-produce his 3D wheelchairs for dolls that come with adjustable leg rests and sell them to the public. He hopes that a wheelchair accessory for dolls will be ‘as commonplace as a dress in the doll aisle’, and strongly believes that it would mean a great deal to children in wheelchairs to see themselves represented in doll form (and we agree).

HIJARBIE DOLLS

HIJARBIE DOLLS

I must say it is amazing how things reserved just for fun and recreation are being used to instill lifelong cultures and thought patterns in children, the earlier the better as in the case of the hijarbie dolls, dolls made with hijab, created by Nigerian Medical Student, Haneefa Adam.

HIJARBIE DOLLS

HIJARBIE DOLLS

At this rate, children will grow up with a perfect understanding of inclusion of people in however form, shape, size or manner they come and how they deserve love just as much as the next person; also no one gets to be in a society and not feel like a part of it.