MOVING ON FROM FOOD DELIVERIES.

IS COLLECTIVE DELIVERY THE WAY TO THE CONSUMERS' HEART?

Those who are avid users of instagram, would know about this viral meme “if I could get back all the money I’ve spent on food”. Truth is, a lot of money is being spent not just on the food but on the delivery service.

Case study

 PLATFORM CREATED BY GREEN SUMMIT

PLATFORM CREATED BY GREEN SUMMIT

 Virtual eateries have been created by a company called the Green Summit Group; they operate several food-delivery services out of central commissaries in midtown Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Chicago. In New York alone, Green Summit's brands offer all sorts of cuisine "concepts," including meatballs, salad/sandwich/juice, and burgers/grilled cheese.

 TODD MILLMAN AND PETER SCHATZBERG, CO-OWNERS OF GREEN SUMMIT

TODD MILLMAN AND PETER SCHATZBERG, CO-OWNERS OF GREEN SUMMIT

While Green Summit brand can decide to set up its own e-commerce websites and avoid the third-party fees, delivery services such as Seamless, Eat24, UberEats, and Doordash effectively serve as gatekeepers for any urban restaurant hoping to build a delivery business in 2017; not having an actual storefront means Green Summit can switch menus rapidly.

 GOOD UNCLE APPLICATION

GOOD UNCLE APPLICATION

Good Uncle is also a virtual eatery platform, a New York-based startup which is currently test-marketing at Syracuse University in upstate New York. The company sets up agreements with established restaurants with limited or no delivery service in Syracuse to license their recipes and then recreate them in the Good Uncle commissary. Users, who are predominantly college students and the current target market then order meals through the Good Uncle app or through GrubHub and pick them up from one of several stops along a predetermined campus delivery route.

 MOBILE FOOD DELIVERY SERVICE

MOBILE FOOD DELIVERY SERVICE

The company recently raised $2.2 million; founder Wiley Cirelli is an early stage Seamless employee who later founded SinglePlatform before selling it for $100 million in 2012. Cirelli says Good Uncle’s cooks use the exact same ingredients as the restaurants they license menu items from and train with those outlets' own cooks so dishes can be replicated as precisely as possible. Good Uncle sells these meals at student-friendly prices that range from $7 to $16 per item. And because customers pick up their food at a central pickup point, they pay no delivery fee.

The Future of Food Delivery

Asides and beyond innovations related to diversifying and structuring food delivery services, more consumer based plans and methods of operation should be imbibed; a monthly if you like or could be quarterly, annually analysis on consumer behaviour should be run and the results deduced should be the fuel of the next phase of activities.