A Little Bit More

GOOGLE'S NEW ENCODER REDUCES THE SIZE OF JPEG'S WITHOUT REDUCING THE QUALITY

*Attempts to tag all personnel's in the marketing and communications industry* Brace yourself for the great news guys! Reducing the size of files (media and non-media) can be done without bothering about the quality of the image being tampered with as well; so feel free to own up to this mantra "a little bit more" when trying to attach a file and you have a specific dimension required, your quality is safe as before. Google has announced the arrival of a new open source encoder called Guetzli (cookie in Swiss German, not the one in empire  focus guys). The new algorithm will make it possible to reduce the size of JPEG images by about 35% without reducing the quality.

If you have never experienced this, let me paint a quick picture; I have legit spent a whole day trying to download a we-transfer file that needed to go up on the website by 10am; no it was not the network it was the fact that the images were large and were sent in bulk, did i get shouted at for being lackadaisical towards my job? Yes! Did my boss care about the fact that maybe if the photographer or media person involved had sent a smaller image folder things would have been done faster? No. This encoder has immediately solved two problems- Quick web navigation and ease of file transfers. 

In a press release , Google explained in detail how the encoder works. The non-technical explanation is that the algorithm "arranges" data that was previously disordered, making it easier to compress the file. The new means of compression produces a higher quality image than a typical JPEG. Google illustrates the difference below:

 The original image is on the left. Guetzli (on the right) produces a less pixelated result than the standard JPEG (in the center) without the image size being larger. (Source: Google)

The original image is on the left. Guetzli (on the right) produces a less pixelated result than the standard JPEG (in the center) without the image size being larger. (Source: Google)

The downward side to it? The compression takes a long time, but it's worth it eventually, right? At least google thinks so and i second their thesis; furthermore  human raters, consistently preferred Guetzli images over traditional JPEGs; so media content transfer issue, solved!